Hypochromic microcytic anemia with iron overload – Genetics Home Reference

Mutations in the SLC11A2 gene cause hypochromic microcytic anemia with iron overload. The SLC11A2 gene provides instructions for making a protein called divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1). The DMT1 protein is found in all tissues, where its primary role is to transport positively charged iron atoms (ions) within cells. In a section of the small intestine called the duodenum, the DMT1 protein is located within finger-like projections called . These projections absorb nutrients from food as it passes through the intestine and then release them into the bloodstream. In all other cells, including immature red blood cells called erythroblasts, DMT1 is located in the membrane of endosomes, which are specialized compartments that are formed at the cell surface to carry proteins and other molecules to their destinations within the cell. DMT1 transports iron from the endosomes to the cytoplasm so it can be used by the cell.

SLC11A2 gene mutations lead to reduced production of the DMT1 protein, decreased protein function, or impaired ability of the protein to get to the correct location in cells. In erythroblasts, a shortage of DMT1 protein diminishes the amount of iron transported within cells to attach to . As a result, the development of healthy red blood cells is impaired, leading to a shortage of these cells. In the duodenum, a shortage of DMT1 protein decreases iron absorption. To compensate, cells increase production of functional DMT1 protein, which increases iron absorption. Because the red blood cells cannot use the iron that is absorbed, it accumulates in the liver, eventually impairing liver function. The lack of involvement of other tissues in hypochromic microcytic anemia with iron overload is likely because these tissues have other ways to transport iron.

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