Smog,-2nd-Ld

Smog, 2nd Ld

DIAMOND BAR – The South Coast Air Quality Management District reported that air quality was in the good to unhealthy range in the South Coast Air Basin today.

The Maximum Air Quality Index report released by the AQMD lists the maximum Air Quality Index levels — for ozone, PM2.5, and PM10 levels recorded in each area of the South Coast Basin for today.

AREA Ozone PM2.5 PM10

Coastal Area 90 69 NA

Metropolitan Area 151 72 55

San Fernando/Santa Clarita Valleys 45 53 NA

San Gabriel Valley 166 51 53

Inland Orange County 151 64 40

Riverside Valley 97 68 81

San Bernardino Valley 115 45 64

Hemet/Elsinore Area 51 37 41

Temecula/Anza Area 84 52 NA

San Gabriel Mountains NA NA NA

San Bernardino Mountains 42 25 NA

Big Bear Lake NA NA NA

Banning Pass Area 49 45 NA

Coachella Valley/Low Desert 43 53 49

Antelope Valley 39 39 44

Victor Valley 40 46 43

Northern Mojave Desert NA NA NA

Central Mojave Desert NA NA NA

NA values indicate that monitoring data is not available

Maximum Air Quality Index uses the EPA NowCast Method

Air Quality Index Basics: https://airnow.gov/index.cfm?actionaqibasics.aqi

The AQI measures the amount of pollutants in the air, whether ozone, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, PM2.5 (particulate matter 2.5 micrometers or less in diameter) or PM10 (particulate matter 10 micrometers or less in diameter).

Conditions are considered “good” when AQI levels are between zero and 50. Air quality is considered satisfactory, and air pollution poses little or no risk.

When AQI levels are 51 to 100, air quality is deemed “moderate,” which means that air quality is acceptable; however, for some pollutants there may be a moderate health concern for a very small number of people who are unusually sensitive to air pollution.

Air quality is designated “unhealthy for sensitive groups” when AQI levels are from 101 to 150. At this level, active children and adults, and people with respiratory disease, such as asthma, should limit prolonged outdoor exertion.

When AQI levels are between 151 and 200, air quality is deemed “unhealthy.” At this level, active children and adults, and people with respiratory disease, such as asthma, should avoid prolonged outdoor exertion. Everyone else, especially children, should limit prolonged outdoor exertion.

“Very unhealthy” air quality is declared when the AQI registers between 201 and 300. Active children and adults, and people with respiratory disease, should avoid all outdoor exertion when the AQI is at this level. Everyone else, especially children, should limit outdoor exertion.

When AQI levels exceed 300, air quality is designated as “hazardous.” This level triggers health warnings of emergency conditions. The entire population is more likely to be affected.

CNS-10-16-2020 19:13