LAPD to Begin Random Inspections of Body Cams in Attempt to Crack Down on Biased Policing

LAPD information technology bureau officer Jim Stover demonstrates the use of the body camera during a media event displaying the new body cameras to be used by the Los Angeles Police Department in Los Angeles, California August 31, 2015. REUTERS/Al Seib/Pool
LAPD information technology bureau officer Jim Stover demonstrates the use of the body camera during a media event displaying the new body cameras to be used by the Los Angeles Police Department in Los Angeles, California August 31, 2015. REUTERS/Al Seib/Pool

Los Angeles Police Chief Michel Moore announced Tuesday to the Board of Police Commissioners that he and the Los Angeles Police Protective League had reached an agreement to inspect body cam footage that was not used in an arrest or use of force.

The goal of the random inspections is to facilitate the process of finding which officers need more training to avoid any instance of police bias and to create a police force that is fair and consistent.

Currently recording 14,000 interactions a day, the body cm introductions since 2014 have been a valuable tool to LAPD to help reassure that the public is safe from issues of police brutality and bias.

As reported by the LA Times last month, body cams have resulted in finding a total of 56 cases in 2018 where officers had been found to have committed infractions.

Chief Moore remains confident that this is a step in the right direction for a better police force in Los Angeles.

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